You are when you eat

(CNN)We have all heard the age-old weight loss advice to eat less and exercise more. But a number of recent studies suggest that the key to dieting success is not just in how many calories you eat, or don’t, but in when you eat them.

“There has been so much energy on what we eat and on carbohydrates and it’s only very recently that there have been studies to say that we have been ignoring timing and timing might be as important,” said Ruth Patterson, professor of family medicine and public health at the University of California, San Diego. Click here to read article!

Weight loss can reduce severity of asthma

Weight loss reduced asthma severity as measured by airway hyperresponsiveness in obese adults, a research study has shown. The incidence of asthma is 1.47 times higher in obese people than nonobese people, and a three-unit increase in body mass index is associated with a 35 percent increase in the risk of asthma. The study supports the active treatment of comorbid obesity in individuals with asthma. CLICK HERE to read article.

4 biggest myths about fat burning

We all know that it takes hard work and dedication to become lean and fit. While both goals are attainable, they require commitment and a good amount of time to achieve the desired results. Okay, sure we may have faltered here and there, taking a few missteps on our health journey, but that’s why I’m here: to cut through the bull and tell you what REALLY works and what doesn’t. CLICK HERE TO READ ARTICLE.

How much should I weigh?

One of the most common questions we receive in our email inbox is “how much should I weigh for my height and age?” In this article, we will explain the most common ways in which this can be worked out.
To determine how much you should weigh (your ideal body weight) several factors should be considered, including age, muscle-fat ratio, height, sex, and bone density.

Some health professionals suggest that calculating your Body Mass Index (BMI) is the best way to decide whether your body weight is ideal. Others say that BMI is faulty as it does not account for muscle mass and that waist-hip ratio is better. CLICK HERE TO READ ARTICLE!

Following lifestyle guidelines may reduce risk for certain cancers and for overall mortality

A study of nearly a half-million Americans has found that following cancer prevention guidelines from the American Cancer Society may modestly reduce your overall risk of developing cancer and have a greater impact on reducing your overall risk of dying. Having a healthy body weight and staying active appeared to have the most positive impact.

The observational study–the largest of its kind–by researchers at Albert Einstein College of Medicine of Yeshiva University and its NCI-designated Albert Einstein Cancer Center, found that sticking with the guidelines seems to significantly reduce the risk for developing certain cancers, particularly colorectal cancer in both sexes and endometrial cancer in women. The findings were published online in the American Journal of Clinical Nutrition. CLICK HERE TO READ ARTICLE!

Holiday weight gain sticking around?

Those New Year’s resolutions to slim down may be the ironic reason most people don’t shed the extra weight they gain during the holidays, according to a new Cornell University investigation.

The average person packs on just under a pound between Thanksgiving and New Year’s. But those few extra ounces tend to stick to the waistline for years, studies show. Over the course of a lifetime, this slight seasonal weight gain contributes to “creeping obesity” and a host of other health problems. CLICK HERE TO READ ARTICLE!

Obesity’s role in Crohn’s disease and multiple sclerosis

Autoimmune diseases like Crohn’s Disease and multiple sclerosis, in which the immune system attacks its own body rather than predatory invaders, affect 5-20% of the global community. A study published recently in Autoimmunity Reviews by Prof. Yehuda Shoenfeld, the Laura Schwarz-Kipp Chair for Research of Autoimmune Diseases at Tel Aviv University’s Sackler Faculty of Medicine and Head of Zabludowicz Center for Autoimmune Diseases at Chaim Sheba Medical Center, Tel Hashomer, points to the major role obesity plays in triggering and prolonging these autoimmune diseases. CLICK HERE TO READ ARTICLE!

An apple a day keeps the pounds away?


You might not think of apples as being hard to digest and they’re not. But it turns out that they contain a high percentage of nondigestible compounds that may be helpful in preventing disorders associated with obesity.

Scientists at Washington State University say their study finds that Granny Smith apples are particularly beneficial; they encourage the growth of friendly bacteria in the colon because of their high content of non-digestible compounds, including dietary fiber and polyphenols, and low content of available carbohydrates. CLICK HERE TO READ ARTICLE!