Obesity’s role in Crohn’s disease and multiple sclerosis

Autoimmune diseases like Crohn’s Disease and multiple sclerosis, in which the immune system attacks its own body rather than predatory invaders, affect 5-20% of the global community. A study published recently in Autoimmunity Reviews by Prof. Yehuda Shoenfeld, the Laura Schwarz-Kipp Chair for Research of Autoimmune Diseases at Tel Aviv University’s Sackler Faculty of Medicine and Head of Zabludowicz Center for Autoimmune Diseases at Chaim Sheba Medical Center, Tel Hashomer, points to the major role obesity plays in triggering and prolonging these autoimmune diseases. CLICK HERE TO READ ARTICLE!

An apple a day keeps the pounds away?


You might not think of apples as being hard to digest and they’re not. But it turns out that they contain a high percentage of nondigestible compounds that may be helpful in preventing disorders associated with obesity.

Scientists at Washington State University say their study finds that Granny Smith apples are particularly beneficial; they encourage the growth of friendly bacteria in the colon because of their high content of non-digestible compounds, including dietary fiber and polyphenols, and low content of available carbohydrates. CLICK HERE TO READ ARTICLE!

Healthy: the Family Meal

Increasing rates of adolescent obesity and the likelihood that obesity will carry forward into adulthood, have led to various preventive initiatives. It has been suggested that family meals, which tend to include fruits, vegetables, calcium, and whole grains, could be protective against obesity.  In a new study, researchers studied whether frequent family meals during adolescence were protective for overweight and obesity in adulthood. CLICK HERE TO READ ARTICLE!

Train your brain to prefer healthy foods?

It may be possible to train the brain to prefer healthy low-calorie foods over unhealthy higher-calorie foods, according to new research by scientists at the Jean Mayer USDA Human Nutrition Research Center on Aging (USDA HNRCA) at Tufts University and at Massachusetts General Hospital. Published online today in the journal Nutrition & Diabetes, a brain scan study in adult men and women suggests that it is possible to reverse the addictive power of unhealthy food while also increasing preference for healthy foods. CLICK HERE TO READ ARTICLE!

Teen’s lack of sleep increases risk of obesity

Teenagers who don’t get enough sleep may wake up to worse consequences than nodding off during chemistry class. According to new research, risk of being obese by age 21 was 20 percent higher among 16-year-olds who got less than six hours of sleep a night, compared with their peers who slumbered more than eight hours. (The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention recommends nine to ten hours of sleep for teenagers.)

Researchers at the Mailman School of Public Health at Columbia University and the University of North Carolina Gillings School of Public Health are the first to examine the effect of sleeplessness on obesity in teenagers over time, providing the strongest evidence yet that lack of sleep raises risk for an elevated BMI. Results appear in Journal of Pediatrics. CLICK HERE TO READ ARTICLE!

More young men are obese than previously thought

Deakin University research has revealed that more young Australian men are likely to be obese than previously estimated.

The study by researchers with Deakin’s IMPACT Strategic Research Centre found that 24 per cent of young Australian men are obese, as opposed to the previous estimate of eight per cent. They believe the discrepancy is due to inaccuracies with the Body Mass Index (BMI) measurement system. CLICK HERE TO READ ARTICLE!